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Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope.

It is being used in planetarium projectors. Just set your coordinates and go.

A shooting star flashes past Jupiter. You can select different intensities in the View window.

A shooting star flashes past Jupiter. You can select different intensities in the View window.

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The great nebula in Orion. Press N to bring up the nebula labels. Also shown are constellation lines, press C to show or hide them.

The great nebula in Orion. Press N to bring up the nebula labels.

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The dance of the planets above ESO headquarters, near Munich.

The dance of the planets above ESO headquarters, near Munich.

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Full sky view of the constellations, their boundaries and the Milky Way.

Full sky view of the constellations, their boundaries and the Milky Way.

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Constellation art turned on.

Constellation art turned on.

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Click on the picture to the left for details.

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features

sky

  • default catalogue of over 600,000 stars
  • extra catalogues with more than 177 million stars
  • default catalogue of over 80,000 deep-sky objects
  • extra catalogue with more than 1 million deep-sky objects
  • asterisms and illustrations of the constellations
  • constellations for 20+ different cultures
  • images of nebulae (full Messier catalogue)
  • realistic Milky Way
  • very realistic atmosphere, sunrise and sunset
  • the planets and their satellites

interface

  • a powerful zoom feature
  • time control
  • multilingual interface
  • fisheye projection for planetarium domes
  • spheric mirror projection for your own low-cost dome
  • all new graphical interface and extensive keyboard control
  • telescope control

visualisation

  • equatorial and azimuthal grids
  • star twinkling
  • shooting stars
  • tails of comets
  • iridium flares simulation
  • eclipse simulation
  • supernovae and novae simulation
  • 3D sceneries
  • skinnable landscapes, now with spheric panorama projection

customisability

  • plugin system adding artifical satellites, ocular simulation, telescope configuration and more
  • ability to add new solar system objects from on-line resources…
  • add your own deep sky objects, landscapes, constellation images, scripts…

news

system requirements

minimal

  • Linux/Unix; Windows 7 and above; Mac OS X 10.10.0 and above
  • 3D graphics card which supports OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.3
  • 512 MB RAM
  • 250 MB on disk

recommended

  • Linux/Unix; Windows 7 and above; Mac OS X 10.11.0 and above
  • 3D graphics card which supports OpenGL 3.3 and above
  • 1 GiB RAM or more
  • 1.5 GiB on disk

developers

Project coordinator: Fabien Chéreau
Graphic designer: Johan Meuris
Developer: Bogdan Marinov, Alexander Wolf, Timothy Reaves, Guillaume Chéreau, Georg Zotti, Marcos Cardinot, Florian Schaukowitsch',
Continuous Integration: Hans Lambermont
Tester: Khalid AlAjaji
and everyone else in the community.

social media

get involved

You can learn more about Stellarium, get support and help the project via these links:

bzr

The latest development snapshot of Stellarium is kept in Bazaar, a distributed revision control system. If you want to compile development versions of Stellarium, this is the place to get the source code.

git

The official Git-mirrors of latest source code of Stellarium.

irc

Real time chat about Stellarium can be had in the #stellarium IRC channel on the freenode IRC network. Use your favorite IRC client to connect to chat.freenode.net or try the web-based interface.

supporters and friends

Stellarium is produced by the efforts of the developer team, with the help and support of the following people and organisations .

langlinks