Other languages:

Stellarium is a free open source planetarium for your computer. It shows a realistic sky in 3D, just like what you see with the naked eye, binoculars or a telescope.

It is being used in planetarium projectors. Just set your coordinates and go.

A shooting star flashes past the Jupiter. You can select different intensities in the View window.

A shooting star flashes past the Jupiter. You can select different intensities in the View window.

view screenshots »
The great nebula in Orion. Press N to bring up the nebula labels. Also shown are constellation lines, press C to show or hide them.

The great nebula in Orion. Press N to bring up the nebula labels.

view screenshots »
The dance of the planets above ESO headquarters, near Munich.

The dance of the planets above ESO headquarters, near Munich.

view screenshots »
Full sky view of the constellations, their boundaries, the Milky Way.

Full sky view of the constellations, their boundaries, the Milky Way.

view screenshots »
Constellation art turned on.

Constellation art turned on.

view screenshots »
',

Click on the picture to the left for details.

  • Slide 1
  • Slide 2
  • Slide 3
  • Slide 4
  • Slide 5

user contributed landscapes

We have landscapes for the seven continents (in the seven continent model) - all, including from Antarctica!

landscapes: Asia

Screenshot not available Angkor Wat, Cambodia 0.9+
Paul Bourke, Peter Murphy N/A English

Angkor Wat, Cambodia

Screenshot not available Bakheng, Cambodia 0.9+
Paul Bourke, Peter Murphy N/A English

Bakheng, Cambodia

Screenshot not available Bayon, Cambodia 0.9+
Paul Bourke, Peter Murphy N/A English

Bayon, Cambodia

Jantar Mantar at Delhi 0.9+
Barry Perlus CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 English

Between 1727 and 1734 Maharajah Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five astronomical observatories in west central India. The observatories, or “Jantar Mantars” as they are commonly known, incorporate multiple buildings of unique form, each with a specialized function for astronomical measurement. For more information on these fascinating scientific and architectural works see jantarmantar.org.

Screenshot not available N/A
N/A English

Amazing parorama of the summit of Mount Everest, 8.85 km above sea level. Roddy Mackenzie, who climbed the mountain in 1989, captured the image.

The Jai Prakash Instrument at the Jaipur Observatory 0.9+
Barry Perlus CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 English

Between 1727 and 1734 Maharajah Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five astronomical observatories in west central India. The observatories, or “Jantar Mantars” as they are commonly known, incorporate multiple buildings of unique form, each with a specialized function for astronomical measurement. For more information on these fascinating scientific and architectural works see jantarmantar.org.

Jantar Mantar at Jaipur 0.9+
Barry Perlus CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 English

Between 1727 and 1734 Maharajah Jai Singh II of Jaipur constructed five astronomical observatories in west central India. The observatories, or “Jantar Mantars” as they are commonly known, incorporate multiple buildings of unique form, each with a specialized function for astronomical measurement. For more information on these fascinating scientific and architectural works see jantarmantar.org.

Screenshot not available Jantar Mantar 0.9+
Barry Perlus & Stellarium team CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 English

Professor Barry Perlus of Cornell University allowed us to use his panoramic photography of one of the Jantar Mantars in India to create this landscape. For more information on these fascinating scientific and architectural works see jantarmantar.org.

LAMOST 0.9+
John Wei N/A English

The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST), also known as the Guoshoujing Telescope is a meridian reflecting Schmidt telescope, located in Xinglong Station, Hebei Province, China.

langlinks